OUR SUN POLARITY REVERSAL IN FEW YEARS

Something big is about to happen on the sun.  Around FEB TO MARCH 2023 TO 2024 . Our sun will reverse its magnetic polarity as it does every 11 years or so, plus or minus 6 months. The sun’s vast magnetic field is about to flip again but this time in double the or triple the normal effects, and that may bring about havoc on earth.

“It looks like we’re few years away from a complete field reversal. This change will have ripple effects throughout the solar system.”

A new Science Cast video anticipates the reversal of the sun’s global magnetic field.
Image Credit: 
Science@NASA

The sun’s magnetic field changes polarity approximately every 10 to 11 years.  It happens at the peak of each solar cycle as the sun’s inner magnetic dynamo re-organizes itself.  The coming reversal will mark the midpoint of Solar Cycle 24. Half of “solar max” will be behind us, with half yet to come. It happen to earth too .

Just as Earth scientists watch our planet’s polar regions for signs of climate change, solar physicists do the same thing for the sun. All agrees that in few years we will have the worse effect. NASA  at Wilcox have been tracking the sun’s polar magnetism since 1976, and they have recorded three grand reversals—with a fourth in the offing.

The sun’s polar magnetic fields weaken, go to zero and then emerge again with the opposite polarity. This is a regular part of the solar cycle.”

A reversal of the sun’s magnetic field is, literally, a big event. The domain of the sun’s magnetic influence (also known as the “heliosphere”) extends billions of kilometres beyond Pluto. Changes to the field’s polarity ripple all the way out to the Voyager probes, on the doorstep of interstellar space.

An artist's concept of the heliospheric current sheet.
An artist’s concept of the heliospheric current sheet, which becomes more wavy when the sun’s magnetic field flips.

When polar physicists talk about solar field reversals, their conversation often centers on the “current sheet.”  The current sheet is a sprawling surface jutting outward from the sun’s equator where the sun’s slowly rotating magnetic field induces an electrical current.  The current itself is small, only one ten-billionth of an amp per square meter (0.0000000001 amps/m2), but there’s a lot of it: the amperage flows through a region 10,000 km thick and billions of kilometres wide.  Electrically speaking, the entire heliosphere is organized around this enormous sheet.

During field reversals, the current sheet becomes very wavy. Scherrer likens the undulations to the seams on a baseball.  As Earth orbits the sun, we dip in and out of the current sheet. Transitions from one side to another can stir up stormy space weather around our planet.

Cosmic rays are also affected. These are high-energy particles accelerated to nearly light speed by supernova explosions and other violent events in the galaxy.  Cosmic rays are a danger to astronauts and space probes, and some researchers say they might affect the cloudiness and climate of Earth. The current sheet acts as a barrier to cosmic rays, deflecting them as they attempt to penetrate the inner solar system. A wavy, crinkly sheet acts as a better shield against these energetic particles from deep space.

As the field reversal approaches, data from Wilcox show that the sun’s two hemispheres are out of synch.

“The sun’s north pole has already changed sign, while the south pole is racing to catch up,” Scherrer said. “Soon, however, both poles will be reversed, and the second half of solar max will be underway.” thats happened in 2013.

The sun’s magnetic field is set to reverse its polarity in the next few years. , Just as it was in 2013, but in this time it will be much stronger.

This polarity flip is perfectly normal solar behavior, occurring every10 to 11 years at the peak of our star’s activity cycle. But the field reversal doesn’t drive the increase in solar flares and eruptions of superheated plasma, called coronal mass ejections, that is observed around solar max.

One of the things that help clouds form and lightning to flash is cosmic-ray ionization of things in the earth’s atmosphere. So when the cosmic-ray intensity is lower, it means you have fewer places where lightning will occur, and so the storms will probably be a little less intense.

During the reversal, the sun’s polar magnetic fields will weaken all the way down to zero, and then bounce back with the opposite polarity. It will be very strong activity in this coming reversal 2023 to end of 2024 plus or minus 6 months.

Scientists understand that Earth’s magnetic field has flipped its polarity many times over the millennia. In other words, if you were alive about 800,000 years ago, and facing what we call north with a magnetic compass in your hand, the needle would point to ‘south.’ This is because a magnetic compass is calibrated based on Earth’s poles.

Reversals are the rule, not the exception. Earth has settled in the last 20 million years into a pattern of a pole reversal about every 200,000 to 300,000 years ago.

Scientists estimate reversals have happened at least hundreds of times over the past three billion years. And while reversals have happened more frequently in “recent” years, when dinosaurs walked Earth a reversal was more likely to happen only about every one million years in earth.

Sediment cores taken from deep ocean floors can tell scientists about magnetic polarity shifts, providing a direct link between magnetic field activity and the fossil record. The Earth’s magnetic field determines the magnetization of lava as it is laid down on the ocean floor on either side of the Mid-Atlantic Rift where the North American and European continental plates are spreading apart. As the lava solidifies, it creates a record of the orientation of past magnetic fields much like a tape recorder records sound.

The last time that Earth’s poles flipped in a major reversal was about 780,000 years ago, in what scientists call the Brunhes-Matuyama reversal. The fossil record shows no drastic changes in plant or animal life. Deep ocean sediment cores from this period also indicate no changes in glacial activity, based on the amount of oxygen isotopes in the cores.

Earth’s polarity is not a constant. Unlike a classic bar magnet, or the decorative magnets on your refrigerator, the matter governing Earth’s magnetic field moves around. Geophysicists are pretty sure that the reason Earth has a magnetic field is because its solid iron core is surrounded by a fluid ocean of hot, liquid metal.

This process can also be modeled with supercomputers. Ours is, without hyperbole, a dynamic planet. The flow of liquid iron in Earth’s core creates electric currents, which in turn create the magnetic field. So while parts of Earth’s outer core are too deep for scientists to measure directly, we can infer movement in the core by observing changes in the magnetic field.

The magnetic north pole has been creeping northward – by more than 600 miles (1,100 km) – since the early 19th century, when explorers first located it precisely. It is moving faster now, actually, as scientists estimate the pole is migrating northward about 40 miles per year, as opposed to about 10 miles per year in the early 20th century.

Our planet’s magnetic field is predominantly created by the flow of liquid iron inside the core. It has always been a feature of our planet, but it has flipped in polarity repeatedly throughout Earth’s history. Each time it flips – up to 100 times in the past 20 million years, while the reversal can take about 1,000 years to complete.

For a polarity reversal to occur, the magnetic field needs to weaken by about 90% to a threshold level. This process can take thousands of years, and during this time, the lack of a protective magnetic shield around our planet allows more cosmic rays high-energy particles from elsewhere in the universe to hit us.

That’s why it doesn’t happen often in earth, to protect the Human and Animal in the planet. When this happens, these cosmic rays collide with more and more atoms in our atmosphere, such as nitrogen and oxygen. This produces variants of elements called cosmogenic isotopes, such as carbon-14 and beryllium-10, which fall to the surface. And by studying the quantities of these in cores, we can see when polarity reversals took place.

The same will happen to our sun, when the sun gets older and older the reversal of the sun polarity will slow down, from 11 years to 22, then 44 and so on.

Today, we can already see the effects of a weakened magnetic field on our satellites in orbit.

In the Atlantic Ocean between South America and Africa, there is a vast region of Earth’s magnetic field that is about three times weaker than the field strength at the poles.

‘This is a region where we see that satellites consistently (experience) electronic failures,’ said Prof. Finlay. ‘And we don’t understand where this weak field region is coming from, what’s producing it, and how it might change in the future. Major natural disaster such as volcano and earth quakes in large scale is more likely in the next solar  polarity reversal due it is strength . the worse areas of those disasters will be  in Africa and South America, Latin America from Chill ,Argentina and many other countries all the way to middle Africa, from Indonesia to India and most of  the major faults zones in north America. 

Steve Ramsey. Okotoks, Alberta -may 7 – 2020.

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