I CANT BREATH -GEORGE FLOYD screamed with agony

Most USA downtown are burning from anger and distrust , but why is the looting? why is the burning and stealing? why is the destruction of the civilian cars and stores? why you burn others when you are burning from the inside with anger?

It seemingly can happen anywhere – and at any time. In USA From London, Iraq, to Hong Kong, reports indicates that lots of money and assistant came from China communist party and Russia to many of those so called civil right movements , and it is so sad as the majority of the peaceful demonstrators are good but the evil thugs hijack the movement.

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Apparently peaceful cities can sometimes erupt suddenly into widespread, and often sustained, unrest. But what role does psychology play in this? And can it explain how, why and when crowds turn to violence? It is more difficult in this time of isolation ,lost of jobs ,bankruptcies, increase divorce rate because of China virus -19,and it is like a ticking bomb inside everybody ready to explode and they only need one reason. LA, Francisco and many other USA and Canada downtown might be next in this act of violence and crime .

 

The movie we saw before  , called the Joker tells the bleak story of how a mentally ill loner, Arthur Fleck, becomes the infamous comic book villain – and inspires a riotous popular movement. In the film, the stage seems well set for a riot. Gotham City is depicted as a powder keg of lawlessness, inequality, corruption, cuts and all-round despair”.

But is the crowd protesting this – or acting as a mindless mob? As commentator Aditya Vats has pointed out , the film appears to reflect the views of the 17th-century philosopher Thomas Hobbes, who argued that society has a drive towards chaos and destruction. In the film, Fleck is portrayed as the individual who unleashes these apparently innate tendencies when he brutally kills first three wealthy young bankers – and then a TV talk show host live on air. Subsequently, thousands of rioters in clown masks are shown rioting, looting and killing, seemingly inspired by his actions.

This is a simple, and popular, representation of real-world crowd violence. But does it accurately reflect the true psychology underpinning “riotous” behaviour?

Some of these psychological theories : The first, “mad mob theory”, suggests that individuals lose their sense of self, reason and rationality in a crowd and so do things they otherwise might not as an individual.

The second is that collective violence is the product of a convergence of “bad” – or criminal – individuals enacting their violent personal predispositions together in the same space.

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The third is a combination of the first two and is captured in the narrative of Joker: “The bad leading to the mad” . So we have a bad police who took a bad decision and acted stupidly causing the destruction of many cities. To quote from a book on the 2011 English riots Mad mobs and Englishmen : that “evil and unscrupulous people – often outsiders or enemies – take advantage of the gullibility of the crowd in order to use them as a tool for destruction”.

In fact, when people riot, their collective behavior is never mindless. It may often be criminal, but it is structured and coherent with meaning and conscious intent. To address the causes of such violence, we need to understand this. Contrary to expectations, there are actually important boundaries and limits during riots relating to 1) what goes on (and what doesn’t) and 2) what (and who) becomes influential. these behavioural limits of crowd action relate in important ways to the limits of social identification. The St Paul’s study demonstrates that people in riots act according to their assumed social identities and do not behave mindlessly, as if subject to an irrational “group mind”. For example, crowd members described throwing stones at police officers as normative and widespread – “a few bricks went in and then people closed the road and everybody started doing it”. Attacks against other targets, however, were isolated and widely denounced – “a bus … got one window smashed.

Everyone went ‘Ugh’, ‘idiots’.”But why do individual acts of violence spread and “infect” others, inciting them also to riot? Classical crowd theories, like the narrative of the Joker, suggest that mere exposure to the behaviour of others leads observers to act in the same way. According to this line of thinking, behaviour is spread via a process of “contagion”, transmitted automatically from one person to another. This would mean the mere act of watching the Joker kill live on TV could explain why others turned to violence on the streets of Gotham.

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The answer to this is related to how people construct group boundaries (we are more influenced by fellow in-group members than out-group members) and the extent to which actions are in line with prevailing group norms .

As rioting swept across USA , previous research suggests that it was those who identified as anti-police that mobilized onto the streets and were subsequently empowered through their localized interactions with the authorities and each other. The targets of their subsequent collective rioting were not random, but focused predominately on the police, symbols of wealth and large retail outlets owned by big corporations.

The opportunistic thugs and thief’s come between hide among the sheep for one motive only is to steal and loot , and to do that they have to destroyed and burn stores and blame it on the peaceful demonstrators.

IN most USA cities now with the forced isolation and poverty , many people are dying to go back to work , turning USA to a real world Gotham, only those who identified as “anti-wealth” would have been subject to the crowd’s influence during the riots, and only those actions consonant with this identity (for example, attacking and looting symbols of wealth) ,large stores and corporation , big name stores etc would have been “acceptable” to the Joker’s foot soldiers, in this case those looters we saw on TV .

As the riots developed, the apparent disempowerment of the authorities in one location, would have led those who identified as “anti-wealth” in other parts of the city to mobilize onto the streets and take on their erstwhile “common enemy”.

Of course, Joker isn’t real life but its narrative of contagion and random violence is common as an “explanation” of real life. But behind the scenes, with closer rerading of riots , social psychology can help bust the myth of the irrational mob and begin to explain how the fictional city – as well as countless real ones – can and do transform from tranquility into widespread and enduring crowd violence.

Where are the priests? where are the leaders? where is Obama and others ?why they dont stop this madness ,The criminal police men were arrested and some are charged ,other are waiting to be charged , the policeman who kneel on George Floyd is in big trouble now , even his wife file for divorce ,so why is the looting?

DO I BLAME CHINA VIRUS AND CHINA FOR THIS YES I DO  , and this is a long story 

Steve Ramsey, Okotoks- Alberta – Canada

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