Food that cure and Antioxidants

FOOD THAT CURE

ANTHOCYANINS

Red, blue, and purple anthocyanins may help lower blood pressure.

These red, blue, and purple pigments give foods like blueberries, grapes, cranberries, cherries, red cabbage, and eggplant their deep colors. They’re not well absorbed by the body, yet there’s still strong evidence that they could help lower blood pressure and protect against diabetes.

LIGNANS

Lignans in grains and seeds may help prevent heart disease.

When you eat flaxseeds, sesame seeds, whole grains, beans, and berries, your body converts the lignans in them into compounds that behave like estrogen, which may block the natural hormone. Lignans are being studied because they might play a role in preventing illnesses like heart disease and endometrial cancer.

RESVERATROL

Resveratrol in wine may have benefits for your brain.

It’s been studied for nearly 30 years. Scientists used to think this is what made red wine good for your heart, but that doesn’t seem to have held up. We still have a lot to learn about this compound in grapes, some berries, and — surprise! — peanuts, but it has shown promise as a possible cancer fighter and brain booster. God order us not to to do so , especially to samson when he asked him not to drink it and not to cut your hair so he can give him the power beyond his imagination.

CURCUMIN

Deep yellow curcumin is a potent inflammation fighter.

This gives the spice turmeric its deep yellow-orange hue. Common in Indian, Middle Eastern, and Southeast Asian dishes, turmeric is trendy with health-conscious Americans, showing up on menus at juice bars and coffeehouses. It may protect against type 2 diabetes, cut inflammation, and fight depression, but seasoning a meal won’t give you enough to be effective. And taking it as a supplement could change how some prescription drugs work.

QUERCETIN

Quercetin may help ease asthma symptoms and fight cancer.

This well-studied flavonoid is in apples, onions, berries, and red wine. Flavonoids help keep your bones, cartilage, blood, fat, and small blood vessels healthy. Quercetin might ease asthma symptoms, lower cholesterol levels, and fight cancer.

SULFORAPHANE

Antioxidant sulforaphane is found in abundance in cruciferous vegetables.

When you chop, chew, and digest cruciferous veggies like broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, and kale, you get this powerful antioxidant (which is also responsible for that rotten smell). It may help lower your chance of getting certain cancers, including breast cancer. Start with fresh, rather than frozen, and eat these veggies lightly cooked: steamed, microwaved, or in a stir-fry.

LYCOPENE

Lycopene is a red pigment in tomatoes that may help ward off prostate cancer.

This red pigment gives the blush to tomatoes, watermelon, and pink grapefruit. Scientists are excited about lycopene potential to help fight cancer, particularly prostate cancer.

ISOFLAVONES

Tofu and edamame are rich in phytoestrogens.

They’re also called phytoestrogens, because they behave like the hormone estrogen when they’re in a human body. Some women going through menopause use isoflavones as a way to ease symptoms like hot flashes. Soy products like tofu and edamame are the richest sources.

CAPSAICIN

Capsaicin in spicy peppers is a potent pain reliever.

It puts the heat in cayenne and other spicy peppers. Capsaicin creams are used to relieve pain from arthritis, fibromyalgia, and some types of nerve damage as well as psoriasis itching. It’s also being studied as a way to fight cancer, help with weight loss, and — ironically — treat heartburn.

ELLAGIC ACID

Ellagic acid is found in red raspberries, strawberries, and pomegranates.

You’ll get it from red fruits — raspberries, strawberries, and pomegranates — and walnuts. You can also buy it as a supplement. A quick search on the Internet will pull up lots of hype about using it as a fat burner and cancer fighter, but these claims are based on lab studies on mice and rats, not people.

FOOD THAT CURE

LUTEIN AND ZEAXANTHIN

Eat more leafy greens to load up on lutein and zeaxanthin.

They protect your eyes and vision by absorbing harmful light waves. Having them in your diet has been linked to a lower risk of age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in older adults. Eat dark, leafy greens with healthy fats to help your body absorb these nutrients.

ALLICIN

Chop or crush garlic to release the antioxidant allicin.

Crush or chop garlic, and you’ll start a chemical reaction that creates this compound in less than a minute. It’s an antioxidant, which means it helps protect cells from damage. It may also help interrupt inflammation, improve blood pressure and cholesterol levels, and fight germs.

CATECHINS

Catechins in chocolate may help protect against heart disease.

Pass the chocolate and red wine! Among the many reasons they’re good for you, they have catechins. Early research suggests that foods and drinks with these phytonutrients — like tea, cocoa, grapes, apples, and berries — may help fight cancer and protect against heart disease.

BETA CAROTENE

Beta carotene is the orange pigment your body turns into vitamin A.

This pigment is what gives carrots, sweet potatoes, and pumpkins their orange hue. (It’s also in spinach and kale, but the green from chlorophyll overpowers it.) Your body uses beta carotene to make vitamin A, which helps keep your immune system and vision working well.

BLUEBERRIES

The deep blue of these berries does more than make a pretty pie.

The deep blue of these berries does more than make a pretty pie. The color comes from potent compounds called anthocyanins. Scientists think these antioxidants may help protect you from cancer, heart disease, and dementia, and boost your immune system. But we need more research to know for sure. Eat these juicy gems fresh or frozen. They have water and fiber, which fill you up without wrecking your diet. A half-cup has about 40 calories.

ACAI BERRIES

These grape-like fruits are often called a superfood, because they may have more antioxidants than other berries.

These grape-like fruits (pronounced “ah-sigh-EE”) are often called a superfood, because they may have more antioxidants than other berries. Those nutrients can stop cell damage that can lead to many diseases. Still, more research will help us know how much they can help. Enjoy fresh or frozen acai berries, but check with your doctor before you take them as supplements. Large doses can be harmful and may affect how some medicines work.

AVOCADO

Surprise! Avocados are single-seeded berries.

Surprise! Avocados are single-seeded berries. Their soft green flesh is loaded with vitamins, minerals, and healthy fats. Avocados can help your heart, support weight loss, and may keep you healthy as you get older. Slice and add to salads, blend into smoothies, or spread onto sandwiches instead of mayonnaise. Just don’t overdo it. One serving is 1/5 of an avocado.

BLACKBERRIES

Blackberries have a lot of polyphenols, chemicals that may cut inflammation that leads to heart disease and cancer.

Blackberries have a lot of polyphenols, chemicals that may cut inflammation that leads to heart disease and cancer. The berries may also help your small intestine break down sugar better, which could lower your odds of type 2 diabetes. Eat them fresh or frozen if you can. A cup of plain blackberries has 7 grams of sugar. The same amount canned in heavy syrup has over 50 grams. Boysenberries and marionberries are types of blackberries.

STRAWBERRIES

These sweet, heart-shaped fruits are full of vitamin C, folic acid, fiber, and antioxidants. They may help lower high blood pressure and cholesterol, help you manage blood sugar, and fight the effects of aging on your brain. Since strawberries spoil quickly, buy them often. To reap the most health benefits, don’t wash or hull them until you’re ready to eat and enjoy.

GOJI BERRIES,

I have them in my backyard .I never buy them as I have enough to eat , dry and freeze that last me all year.

Sometimes called wolfberries, they have been part of Chinese medicine for thousands of years.

Sometimes called wolfberries, they’ve been part of Chinese medicine for thousands of years. They have vitamins (C, B2, and A), iron, and antioxidants. Scientists have looked for proof that they boost immunity, fight heart disease, help the brain, aid digestion, and prevent cancer, but so far, they don’t know for sure. Only eat them ripe. Unripe ones can be toxic. And don’t eat them if you‘re pregnant, nursing, or taking blood thinners.

CRANBERRIES

If you tend to get urinary tract infections, you may have downed cranberry juice.

If you tend to get urinary tract infections, you may have downed cranberry juice. It won’t treat UTIs, but cranberry supplements may cut your odds of getting them later. The berries may make it less likely bacteria will stay in your stomach and cause infections. Scientists are studying if they can prevent cancer and boost heart health. Watch how much of the juice you drink: Too much may upset your stomach and lead to kidney stones.

ARONIA BERRIES

These dark purple berries, also known as chokeberries, are high in vitamins, minerals, and nutrients.

These dark purple berries, also known as chokeberries, are high in vitamins, minerals, and nutrients. Because of that, researchers are checking into whether they can help prevent cervical, skin, breast, and colon cancers. Scientists are also studying if aronia berries could help fight liver and heart disease and even obesity. Look for them fresh or frozen at the store. You can also sip aronia-infused tea.

ELDERBERRIES

For hundreds of years, people used them to fight colds and flu.

For hundreds of years, people used them to fight colds and flu. A few studies suggest that their extract may shorten flu symptoms if you take them in the first day or two. Only eat cooked elderberries — raw ones or their leaves can make you sick. Also, women who are pregnant or breastfeeding or anyone with immune system problems shouldn’t have the berries at all. Don’t use them if you take diabetes medicines, diuretics, or laxatives.

RED RASPBERRIES

As far back as A.D. 4, parts of raspberry plants were used to treat morning sickness and stomach pain.

As far back as A.D. 4, parts of raspberry plants were used to treat morning sickness and stomach pain. Now we know the berries themselves have power. Raspberries are loaded with nutrients that may help fight different types of cancer and others that may protect your brain. Although you can find some of these same substances in diet supplements, treat yourself to fresh raspberries. They’ll give you the most benefits.

CLOUDBERRIES

A 2/3-cup serving of these peach-colored berries has twice the vitamin C of a glass of orange juice.

A 2/3-cup serving of these peach-colored berries has twice the vitamin C of a glass of orange juice. They’re also rich in antioxidants, which is one reason you’ll find them as an ingredient in some skin care products. It’s best to eat the berries the same day they’re picked, but you can also freeze them for up to 2 years.

KIWIBERRIES

You probably know their fuzzy, egg-shaped cousin, the kiwi fruit.

You probably know their fuzzy, egg-shaped cousin, the kiwi fruit. These grape-sized berries are about the same in taste and nutrition. They have lutein, which helps protect your eyes; zinc for healthy skin, hair and nails; and potassium, which helps you get a better workout. Since their skin is fuzz-free, they’re easy to pop into your mouth for a quick, sweet snack.

BILBERRIES (HUCKLEBERRIES)

These berries have long been thought to improve vision.

These berries have long been thought to improve vision. (World War II pilots ate bilberry jam in hopes of making their night vision better.) While their extract may help prevent eye problems like macular degeneration and cataracts, we need more research to know for sure. Ask your doctor before you take bilberry extracts or supplements. But enjoy the sweet-tart flavor of fresh ones in late summer and early fall.

GINSENG BERRIES

In Chinese medicine, the root of the ginseng plant is a common treatment.

In Chinese medicine, the root of the ginseng plant is a common treatment. But what about its berries? Studies of mice showed they may be able to lower cholesterol, fight cancer, and lower gut inflammation. If you have diabetes, there’s some evidence that ginseng berry juice could help you control your blood sugar and weight. Look for ginseng berry extract in skin products, too. It may help fight skin damage and the effects of aging.

GOOSEBERRIES

These fruits can be light green, pink, or red when they get ripe.

These fruits can be light green, pink, or red when they get ripe. In India, one type, amla, has long been used to treat colds and fever, help digest food, and as hair tonic. Now, some evidence suggests these berries could help fight cancer, boost liver health, prevent osteoporosis, and treat parasites and infections. But scientists need to do more research. Enjoy them fresh or cooked, but ask your doctor before you start a supplement.

FOOD THAT CURE

WHAT ARE ANTIOXIDANTS?

They're chemicals that fight a process in your cells called oxidation.

They’re chemicals that fight a process in your cells called oxidation. The main source is plant-based foods, but your body makes some, too. You’re probably familiar with vitamins C and E, beta-carotene, and the minerals selenium and manganese. Plant nutrients and chemicals like flavonoids, phenols, polyphenols, and phytoestrogens are also antioxidants.

WHAT DO ANTIOXIDANTS DO?

These chemicals cause the oxidation process that damages your cells and the genetic material inside them.

Each one works differently. Together they form a team that fights free radicals. These chemicals cause the oxidation process that damages your cells and the genetic material inside them. Your body makes free radicals as it processes food, sunlight, and toxins like smoke, pollution, and alcohol. Antioxidants either stop free radicals before they form or break them down so they’re harmless.

VITAMIN E

This antioxidant is stored in fat.

This antioxidant is stored in fat (you may hear it called fat-soluble). It fights off free radicals that attack fats in your cell walls. It may also stop LDL cholesterol from turning into a form that could harden your arteries (your doctor may call it oxidized) and lead to cardiovascular disease.

Where to get it: Whole grains, vegetable oils (olive, sunflower, canola), nuts, and green leafy vegetables.

VITAMIN C

Also known as ascorbic acid, it's stored in water.

Also known as ascorbic acid, it’s stored in water (you may hear it called water-soluble). It may help prevent cancers of the stomach, lung, and digestive system.

Where to get it: Green vegetables, tomatoes, and citrus fruits like oranges and grapefruits. Choose raw foods because cooking may destroy it.

BETA-CAROTENE

Your body turns it into retinol, which helps you see.

It’s a fat-soluble carotenoid (those are the yellow, orange, and red pigments in vegetables and fruits). Your body turns it into retinol, which helps you see. It may be dangerous when taken in supplement form, so it’s best when it comes from food.

Where to get it: Fruits, grains, carrots, squash, spinach, and other green vegetables.

LYCOPENE

This carotenoid may help protect against prostate, lung, and breast cancer.

This carotenoid may help protect against prostate, lung, and breast cancer.

Where to get it: Cooked and processed tomatoes are a good and common source: Think marinara sauce on your pasta. Heating the tomatoes makes it easier for your body to absorb the lycopene. Add a bit of fat like olive oil to further help your body use this nutrient.

SELENIUM

Found in soil and water, this mineral helps your thyroid work.

Found in soil and water, this mineral helps your thyroid work. Research suggests it can help protect against cancer, especially of the lung, colon, and prostate. It’s easy to get too much if you take it as a supplement. That can lead to digestive problems, hair and nail loss, and even cirrhosis of the liver.

Where to get it: Grains, onions, garlic, nuts, soybeans, seafood, meat, and liver.

FLAVONOIDS

Scientists know about more than 4,000 of these antioxidants found in fruits and veggies.

Scientists know about more than 4,000 of these antioxidants found in fruits and veggies. Every plant contains a different flavonoid combination. They may help protect against heart disease, cancer, arthritis, aging, cataracts, memory loss, stroke, inflammation, and infection.

Where to get them: Green tea, grapes, red wine, apples, chocolate, and berries.

OMEGA-3 AND OMEGA-6 FATTY ACIDS

Omega-3s help protect against heart disease, stroke, arthritis, cataracts, and cancer.

Omega-3s help protect against heart disease, stroke, arthritis, cataracts, and cancer. Omega-6s help improve eczema, psoriasis, and osteoporosis. Your body can’t make these essential fatty acids, which help stop inflammation. And most Americans get far more omega 6 in their diet and far less omega 3 than they need. Eating less omega 6 and more omega 3 is a recommended goal for many. Just keep in mind that a balanced ratio is four parts omega-6 to 1 part omega 3. There are supplements, but it’s better when these fatty acids come from food.

Where to get them:

  • Omega-3s: Salmon, tuna, sardines, walnuts
  • Omega-6s: Vegetable oils, nuts, poultry

CAN’T YOU JUST TAKE A PILL?

Longterm studies on tens of thousands of people show that antioxidants in pill form do not lower your odds of bad health.

Nope. Long-term studies on tens of thousands of people show that antioxidants in pill form don’t lower your odds of bad health. People who took them got heart disease, cancer, and cataracts at the same rate as those who didn’t. One exception is age-related macular degeneration. Antioxidant supplements slowed progress a little for some people in late stages of this eye disease.

ARE FRUITS AND VEGGIES THE SECRET?

Vegetables and fruits have lots of antioxidants.

Sort of. Vegetables and fruits have lots of antioxidants. And it’s true that if you eat more of them, you’re less likely to get any number of diseases. What isn’t clear is why. It may be the antioxidants, or it might be other chemicals in those foods. It could even be that people who eat them make healthier lifestyle choices overall. Scientists continue to explore the issue.

TOO MUCH OF A GOOD THING?

It’s hard to get too many antioxidants from the food you eat. That isn’t the case, however, for those in supplement form. Too much beta-carotene may raise your lung cancer risk if you smoke. Too much vitamin E could make you more likely to get prostate cancer or have a stroke. These products can also change the way certain medicines work. Tell your doctor about any you take to make sure they don’t get in the way of your medication.

Steve Ramsey, PhD- Public Health, PgD- Natural Health

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By Dr.Steve Ramsey,PhD

Greeting from Calgary, Alberta - Canada. My name is Saad Al-Hashimi. Known as Steve Ramsey PhD, I am the founder and the director of the Paranormal zone- Haunting Dimensions. That deals with an investigation, debunking, and healing/cleansing since 1986. Having had many unexplainable experiences from a young age at a possible "haunted" house where plenty of things seemed to happen that I couldn’t explain, since that time and I am looking and searching for an answer. After continuing to have many experiences that I just cannot explain, I have since become a firm believer that GHOSTS do exist. I continued for a short while as a member of a few other paranormal groups until I was very fortunate to become involved with a local fast growing organization where I felt very comfortable to start my own paranormal investigation. My best experience has been Indio California, Okotoks Alberta, Baghdad city , and many other places in Greece and North Canada. (yes I do believe spirits can hurt you so you have to be careful not to provoke or challenge a spirit ). I won’t tell you the whole story now but you are more than welcome to ask me on a ghost hunt. I am now looking forward to meeting many more people, all looking for that ‘experience’ that could possibly convince them that there is something more to life than we first thought. So please feel free to email me drsteveramsey@gmail.com I have been involved in several paranormal groups over the years. Paranormal Adventures is different and exciting in ways I couldn’t possibly get before. When people ask if I believe in ghosts, I say I am a skeptical believer. I have had many encounters with spirit forms and believe what I have seen to be real and unexplainable. I always look for a normal mundane reason why at the same time. My area of expertise in the field of science. I have Ph.D. in Public Health from the USA, Master degree in Medical Ultrasound and BSc Degree in Diagnostic Imaging from Charles Sturt University Australia, BSc in Physics, and Radiology diploma from Iraq, Pharmacy diploma. Radiography diploma from London Ontario, Diploma in Natural Health from Quebec, Canada. Radiation physics from Australia, I studied the infra and ultrasound in the animal kingdom.P resented more than 20 lectures in Iraq, Greece, Germany, South Korea, Japan, Canada and I am the peer reviewer for the radiographer journal in UK, Netherlands, and South Africa. Earned the 3rd award for excellence in ultrasound - Canada 2005. I am also armature archaeologist, painter, calligrapher, and used to run acting theater play in Iraq- Baghdad, wrote, directed and acted in more than 27 plays. So debunking come naturally in my science and technology back round, and not like other debunking people around you who use Google for their search and call them self-debunkers, It doesn't work that way. In the near future, I will run live internet ghost hunts with night vision cameras giving users at home the chance to watch the spooky footage on, in my nights out. I look forward to seeing you all soon on one of our many events! I loved reading ghost stories and sitting on my own in the dark watching horror films. However. I Can decode dreams, and I see spirits in my dreams. I like to look at things from a scientific point of view and try to rule out all rational possibilities before concluding that events are paranormal. However, I do try to keep an open mind on all investigations. I started taking part in investigations since 1986; my first investigation usually any house, apartment that I move in or my friend's places. For many of my true paranormal stories you can read them at www.linkedin.com I will try to copy and move all my articles here in this site in near future. Thank you for reading and God Bless you all. Steve Ramsey PhD. Alberta