Narcissism , psychopathy and leadership

narcissism (example president Trump), psychopathy ; For 15 years, research into dark personality traits (including narcissism (example president Trump), psychopathy and Machiavellianism) has been rapidly expanding. We now know that these traits are far more evident, on average, in men than women. Continue Reading →

Are we in control

Are we in control? And if so where is God in this picture?When a jury finds a defendant guilty of a crime or a tribunal disciplines a doctor for malpractice, we tacitly assume that the blameworthy party had a good awareness of their actions and the outcomes that ensued.  

We always assume things because there are many fake and false stories and many good actors who get away with crime because they have a good lawyer who can make you believe that his client is suffering from delusions caused by stress, depression and mental illness. Continue Reading →

How your brain is handling the pandemic?

How your brain is handling the pandemic? In record numbers, Americans are anxious, worried, sleep-deprived, distracted, and depressed. The China virus pandemic’s triple whammy of an invisible and omnipresent threat (coronavirus infection), profound disruptions in daily life, and uncertainty for the future has thrust many people into a chronic, high-stress state that is, let’s just say, less than optimal for rational thinking or any other sort of higher-order cognitive functioning.

While the Covid-19 pandemic rages on worldwide, the immediate mental health impact of this collective trauma is coming into focus even as the outlook for long-term psychological effects remains considerably fuzzier. People are suffering with Covid stress, covid anxiety , covid depression and covid anger ,fighting each others , pointing fingers, reduce trust in the government and health authorities who changing their mind all the time making the people less trusted with what they say.

Are we experiencing a pandemic of mental illness? Much has been reported about the ill-termed “mental health pandemic” that seems to be surging through the U.S. and other countries in lockstep with lockdowns and the death, societal disruption, and economic devastation of the viral pandemic.

Many experts have sounded the alarm too late and in some areas too shallow, for an approaching tsunami of psychological maladies that could sink an already overburdened mental healthcare system. People are not used too seen their families less, not traveling, not gathering , not going to bars and movies , not going to the games, wedding and parties, this is the heart of American and Canadian way of living ,It is hard to adjust to new reality for them . They can’t find toilet papers in the store! What the F is going on as many says.

A growing cache of data seems to bear out those fears. One of the most recent, survey conducted in April and May, found a three-fold increase in depression since the pandemic began.

The researchers examined mental health problems relative to 13 pandemic-specific stressors, including loss of a job, death of someone close to you due to Covid-19, and financial problems (see box for full list). The more stressors people reported, the more likely they were to also report symptoms of anxiety and depression.

Other studies show similar rises. From April to June, the Census Bureau tracked anxiety and depression symptoms among Americans in weekly emergency surveys, finding a sharp rise in both.

In a Kaiser Family Foundation Health conducted in July, more than half of U.S. adults (53 percent) said worry and stress related to coronavirus has had a negative impact on their mental health, up from 39 percent in May.

A key question is whether, and to what degree, pandemic-related symptoms of anxiety and depression will progress into serious mental illness and increased rates of suicide and addiction, or if all this angst and gloom is more accurately seen as a normal adaptive response to the amped-up stress that many people are experiencing during Covid.

The evolving field of disaster mental health requires that practitioners (clinicians and indigenous helpers) work with individuals and whole communities in the field rather than in an office. 

Among the lessons it has taught us is that large-scale traumatic events such as 9/11 or Hurricane Katrina trigger immediate and persistent psychological symptoms in large swaths of the affected population. Continue Reading →

Reach us to help you for free in this time of severe Anxiety

HELP LINE  HERE WITH US IS  for FREE, I can help you in this time of uncertainty , sadness, stress, anger issues, depression, and severe anxiety 

Dear Friends, and readers

For many people who have recently lost a loved one, the very sight of leaves falling from the trees in This winter with covid still in the Air and China virus killing millions and destroying lives and economy, fear sets in and the worse than that is increasing level of anxiety from fear of death, contracting china virus, and losing loved one over, the upcoming holiday season.

The closer we get to December, the greater the pain and loneliness which often creates the impression that the holidays may be impossible to survive.

To make matters worse, it seems that we are left alone with these feelings, because it is not appropriate to discuss a sad topic like grief, sadness, stress and anger and we left alone to deal with denial, shock, anger  and  depression ,mourning during the holidays when everyone around us is carefree and happy, or pretending to be happy.

The loss of life is worse but it can be devastated also when you lose your job, divorce your partner or lose your pet. Crying seems the only comfort you have at this moment. 

So how to “survive” those first holidays after the loss of a significant person or element in your life? You can email me , here in my blog  and I will do my best to help you guide you for free , you are not alone, and you need someone to listen to your pain and help you to navigate the difficulties 

If you are in a situation where you can’t cope you can email me for help. If I do not answer immediately or replies right away, please understand that we receive hundreds of emails a month.

I can also direct you to social worker or clinical psychologist and hope I can help you to realize that this life is a short trip and we must do our best to help each other, be kind to one another and point the facts and not fingers. Remember that in extreme stress, anxiety and depression you are weak and the paranormal senses can be very strong and you think you are losing your mind.

Steve Ramsey, PhD, Public Health, PgD-Natural Health ,

MSc medical ultrasound, BSc diagnostic imaging. Diploma in Radiology, Diploma in Sonography, SPI Physics teacher online, and MSK hands on instructor. Author

Paranormal researcher, expert and investigator, and Blogger

drsteveramsey@gmail.com

Steve Continue Reading →

Many mentally challenged and dangerous immigrants

Many mentally challenged and dangerous immigrants brought to Canada, we ask why? Canadians should sue the immigration minister and Canada officials who bring those people with so many mental issues from bipolarism, psychosis , schizophrenia, to many other problems here to Canada and we the taxpayers pay the bills under humanity and human rights .  Many of those people come specifically from India, punjab,Iran, Iraq, Pakistan, Jordan, Eastern Europe and China. Then they have anxiety and depression in this cold country with long winter and kill people , beheaded them in greyhound bus , rape children , paedophile behaviour , so called honour killing, killing people with cars and drive overtime then the court release them due to mental issues back to the street. Or some go to spend time in 5 star hotel called canada prison with everything paid from schooling to food to finishing a degree ! enough is enough and stop bringing those  people here  without screening , we are sick and tired and it is not fair for the rest of indians, punjabis, and middleastren people who are good and work hard and have great personality but people here look at the bad apple, and the retarded person and then judge all the same.

said a person from the community. Zaineddin Al Aalak (inset) was charged with second-degree murder and committing an indignity to a body in connection with the death of his father, whose body was discovered at a construction site in Okotoks. AL CHAREST/POSTMEDIA

A Calgary man accused of killing his father and dumping his remains at an Okotoks construction site made a brief appearance in a Calgary courtroom Thursday morning.

Zaineddin Al Aalak is charged with second-degree murder and committing an indignity to a body in connection with the death of his father, whose body was discovered Monday.

Hiking dinosaur goes to great heights for Calgary Food Bank

Thursday morning, the 21-year-old appeared briefly in a Calgary courtroom via CCTV from the remand centre. The matter was put over for another month.

Police believe an altercation that occurred at Al Aalak’s Acadia home ultimately led to the death of his father, whose body was discovered at the construction site on the D’Arcy Ranch golf course.

Officers were first called to the accused’s home late Monday afternoon for a check on welfare call. 

Police returned the next day “to ask more questions and to connect some dots,” said Calgary police acting Insp. Paul Wozney, and Al Aalak was eventually arrested and charged.

The name of the accused’s 53-year-old father has not officially been confirmed by authorities.

A former high school classmate and friend of Al Aalak from Hamilton, Ont., said he was “shocked” when he learned about the charges.

“He never came across as violent whatsoever,” said the friend, who asked not to be identified. 

Social media accounts appearing to belong to the accused clearly indicated his passion for martial arts.

Al Aalak followed several mixed martial arts fighters on social media and appeared to maintain his own Facebook page promoting himself as an MMA athlete.

Zaineddin Al Aalak on trial for 2nd-degree murder in 2017 death of his father Mohamed Continue Reading →

Drifting away a Family estrangements are fundamental to the human story

Family estrangements are fundamental to the human story, starting the day that God tossed Adam and Eve from the garden. Likewise, in Greek mythology, there’s Electra, who murdered her mother to avenge her father, and Tantalus, who cooked his son and fed him to Olympian gods.  Then Abraham who almost killed his son Ishmael as a sacrifice just when he puts the knife on his neck , God stopped him and replace the sacrifice with a lamb.

Marriage may fall ,partners drifting away from each other, romance turn to boring life and a nutshell routine,  family cut-offs have led to painful, shattering ends: King Henry II was forever on edge fielding challenges and betrayals from his sons; Mozart’s marriage left him estranged from his father, the controlling, nagging, unbearable Leopold;  This king also killed most of his wives and broke the catholic law by marring his wife sister after killing here , that’s why he discovered the Anglican church to separate from the catholic  and make his own rules.

 The American founding father Benjamin Franklin broke from his son, William, who supported the British king. Then there was the rift between Ronald Reagan and his activist daughter, Patti; and between Barack Obama’s, Jr and Sr. the list goes on.

Estrangements between siblings are especially brutal. The sisters and Hollywood stars Olivia de Havilland and Joan Fontaine engaged in a lifelong feud. Julia Roberts helped to fund a custody battle against her brother and fellow actor, Eric. From Cleopatra to Genghis Khan, the powerful have murdered or cut off their siblings as a matter of routine.

I’ve seen breakups in my own family. My brother and his wife, I tried hard to make them back but few years later they are departed, I blame my brother behavior for losing such a wonderful and beautiful woman. I bought them a house  and helped them so much but at the end all the money I spent didn’t help at all . When you lose respect you lose the passion and romance.

The statistics on family estrangement vary by study but are always sobering. In 2015, the psychologist Richard Conti of Kean University reported that more than 43 per cent of the 154 students he surveyed had experienced a family estrangement.

 More recent statistics come from Karl Pillemer, a family sociologist and gerontologist directing the Cornell Family Reconciliation Project. In his latest book, Fault Lines: Fractured Families and How to Mend Them (2020), he reports that among a representative sample of 1,340 Americans aged 18 and older, 27 per cent were estranged from a relative – including 10 per cent estranged from a parent or child, 8 per cent from a sibling, and the remaining 9 per cent estranged from a smattering of cousins, aunts, uncles, grandparents and other relations. Half of these estrangements had gone on for at least four years. Looking only at immediate families, Pillemer estimates that nearly 20 per cent of American adults are in a state of estrangement right now.

This cold stat shows the human suffering caused by estrangement. ‘Being rejected by family, or deciding to leave, can be one of the most traumatic experiences in a person’s life, ‘writes the social work researcher Kylie Agllias in Family Estrangement: A Matter of Perspective (2016). ‘Adult children are maligned for estranging an older parent, or parents shamed for casting out a child,’ and sibling estrangements are ‘often overlooked altogether’.

Thankfully, a group of therapists and social scientists are forging a road back. One of them is the American psychologist Joshua Coleman, author of the forthcoming book  Rules of Estrangement. His interest in the field was sparked after his own daughter, then in her early 20s, cut him off. ‘It was the most painful, disorienting thing that I’ve ever had to go through,’ he tells me. He consulted a series of therapists who gave him ‘terrible, counterproductive advice, from telling me to point out all the good things I’d done for her to demanding she talk to me’.

 None of it worked so Coleman came up with a plan of his own: he would see everything through his daughter’s eyes and take responsibility for her complaints. It took a while, but the strategy was effective, and his daughter took him back. ‘We are now very close,’ he says.

A complementary perspective comes from Pillemer. ‘Can’t live with them, can’t live without them,’ he says of families after decades of research. Despite the cheery view of family depicted in media, in reality ‘most people have an ambivalent experience’, he says. As part of the research for his earlier book 30 Lessons for Living: Tried and True Advice from the Wisest Americans (2012), Pillemer asked the elderly about life lessons they valued most. ‘A surprising number … talked about family estrangements as the most disruptive [and] distressing’ events of all, he says.

Finding almost no existing research on the topic, Pillemer stepped into the breach, launching a series of studies including a national survey­ and in-depth interviews. These people, who’d been through estrangement, were ‘despondent’, says Pillemer. But as the interviews continued, he ran into a minority who had successfully reconciled after 10, 20 or even 30 years. ‘For them it was so powerful, it was such a transformative experience’ that Pillemer shifted his focus to them, culling their wisdom into his new book Fault Lines. Continue Reading →