How to choose between two jobs

Then, ask yourself the following questions:

·Which job still lines up with my career goals?

·What really matters, Write down everything that matters most when it comes to your job or career. This list might include promotion opportunities, salary, commission structure, company culture, type of work, control over the projects on which you will work, bonus eligibility, benefits such as medical coverage, hours of work per week, or the amount of business travel.

·Does one job have more opportunities than the other?

·Which job will challenge me?

·Which job offers me the chance to learn new skills or sharpen my skill?

·Prioritize. After brainstorming, read through the list and prioritize the items from most important to least. Analyze. Make two columns next to your prioritized list, one for each job opportunity. Think through each item and how well each job will provide for/satisfy each priority, writing notes in both columns

If you’re having trouble deciding between two jobs, consider both through the lens of your long-term goals. Consider which position holds the most promise, and choose the one that will get you where you want to go. Don’t get stuck just because you are in a comfort zone.

2. Weigh salary with personal satisfaction

When choosing between two jobs, an easy question comes to mind: Which one pays more? But remember that Salary is not everything as long as you don’t lose so much, select the one that gives you less stress, make you happier, with a team that respects you and celebrates you than a team who always puts you down and points fingers and not the facts.

Make sure that you focus on the Personal satisfaction, as it is also paramount. So what happens if the job you don’t really want pays a lot more than the one you do?

If this is the case, you’ll need to weigh whether a higher salary will make up for a job you don’t like. Sure, you’ll have more money to spend outside of work. But if you’re bored 40 or more hours per week, a higher salary might not boost your happiness much.

If the job teaches you new skills and challenges you, make you happy and make you feel that you are with the winning team then go for it.

I strongly recommend that you decide on your job not necessarily for the money, but for how closely the offer aligns with your values, less stress, and happy work environment.

If one position’s pay is so low you won’t be able to support yourself, you should probably go with the other one. But if both salaries meet your needs, you might be better off choosing a more fulfilling job in terms of respect, low stress level, place that promotes you and there is a room for your progress.

3. Assess the culture of each workplace

Many hiring managers assess cultural fit, so you also should focus on issues such as compassion, trust, meaningful workplace, places with less bullying and rude people.But cultural fit isn’t a one-way street. You also need to decide whether each company is a good fit for you not just for the managers.

If you’ve ever been in a toxic work environment, you know how tiring it can get day after day. Even if you’re passionate about the company’s mission, you’ll lose steam in an uncomfortable workplace, because your managers are stupid, unprofessional, point fingers and not the facts, bullying, they are always right and you are always wrong, they always find a problem and not a solution, and the list goes on and on.

 On the flip side, you might develop a passion for a company if its culture makes you feel valued and challenged. Respect and honesty are the key factors and if they don’t respect you and honor you just leave them and don’t look back. Managers and supervisors are a dime a dozen and it is very rare to find a good leader with leadership quality that you will be honored to follow. Continue Reading →