Sex Demons

Sex Demons

CHRISTIAN WHITE 

Throughout history and all across the world, people have reported sexual contact with all manner of supernatural beings. Many people believe “sex demons” were born out of a need to explain away subjects that were generally considered taboo. More often than not, things such as unexpected pregnancy, abortion, and promiscuity were met with anger and persecution. As a result, society came up with a number of mythical creatures, ten of which are listed below.

 

Popobawa

Popobawa

Popobawa (meaning “bat-wing” in Swahili) is said to be a large, bat-like creature with one eye and a very large penis. It is said to stalk the men and women of Zanzibar, Africa, and surrounding islands. It is a shapeshifter, often taking the form of a human or animal. It usually visits households at night, and it doesn’t discriminate against men, women or children, often sodomizing an entire household before moving on. Victims are warned by Popobawa to tell others about the attack or risk it returning. Some said these are done by French soldiers or bad people who rape and use this story to make the women afraid of talking about it.

Popobawa first appeared on the island of Pemba in 1965, and sightings have been reported as recently as 2007. There are several different theories about Popobawa’s origin. Some say it is an angry spirit created by a Sheikh to take vengeance on his neighbors. In 2007, Researcher Benjamin Radford investigated Popobawa and found that its roots are in Islam, the dominant religion of the area. According to Radford, “holding or reciting the Koran is said to keep the Popobawa at bay, much as the Bible is said to dispel Christian demons.”

Others argue (perhaps more realistically) that Popobawa is an articulated social memory of the horrors of slavery. The way in which Popobawa is said to sodomize its victims may also have something to do with the fact that homosexuality is still illegal in Zanzibar.

        9

Trauco and La Fiura

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Chiloé, an island off the south of Chile, is said to be home to the Trauco, a sexually potent Dwarf with the power to paralyze women with a look, before having sex with them. The Trauco is described as being ugly and goblin-like, often wearing a hat and suit. His feet are stumps and he communicates through a series of grunts. Some reports suggest the Trauco doesn’t even need to have intercourse with his victims, that he can, in fact, impregnate them with his gaze.

Often, when a single woman on Chiloé falls pregnant people assume the Trauco is the father. In these cases, the women are considered blameless as the Trauco is said to be irresistible to women. It is another bullshit ghost story from that world where a person rape a woman and they blame it on a demon!

El Trauco’s wife, La Fiura, is said to be a grotesquely ugly dwarf with the ability to cast a “sickness spell” against anyone who rejects her sexual advances. Her breath is so foul it can physically scar a human and turn animals lame. Despite her appearance, she is generally irresistible to men and, after having intercourse with them, she drives them insane.        

 

 

Succubus and Incubus

Incubus-Succubus-2

Probably the most well-known sex demon, the Succubus is a female demon who takes the form of an attractive seductress in order to seduce men. It is generally believed that the Succubus legend came about as a result of the medieval preoccupation with sin, especially sexual sins of women.

The male version of the Succubus is the Incubus. Like his female counterpart, the Incubus will drain the strength and life energy from his victims. Unlike the Succubus, the Incubus will impregnate his victims with another incubus. The victim will then carry the baby to term, but when she gives birth the baby appears to be stillborn. It will have no pulse and it won’t appear to breathe. Then, around the age of seven, the child will appear to behave normally, but will usually be very attractive and intelligent. According to some legends, the wizard Merlin is the product of an Incubus father and a human mother. It is also believed by some that the Virgin Mary was de-flowered by an Incubus.

Many believe the Incubi most likely came about as a scapegoat for rape and sexual assault. Both victim and rapist would have most likely found it easier to explain the attack supernaturally rather than confronting the truth.

        7

Encantado

Z Bosque Encantado

In Brazil and the rainforests of the Amazon Basin, the Boto river dolphin was believed to have shapeshifting powers. It could turn into a very charming and beautiful man called Encantado, or “the enchanted one.” Encantado would take women back to the river, retake dolphin form, and impregnate them. Young women of the region were wary of any man wearing a hat because, according to legend, Encantado always wore a hat to cover up his blowhole.
In many parts of Brazil, it is considered bad luck to kill Boto river dolphins. If you kill one, or in some cases just look them in the eye, it is said you will suffer nightmares for the rest of your life.        

6

Lilu

450Px-Queen Of The Night Babylon

Jewish folklore tells of Lilu, a demon who visits women while they sleep. His feminine counterpart is Lilin. These demons were a particular source of anxiety for mothers because they were known to kidnap children. Ardat Lili was another succubus who would visit men at night to ensure the continuation of her demonic race. The incubus was Urdu Lili, who would visit human women to ensure they would produce his offspring.

5

Liderc

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In the Northern regions of Hungary, there was said to live a creature called the Liderc (or ludvérc, Lucifer, or ördög depending on the region). It hatches from the first egg of a black hen and is often said to hide in people’s pockets. It enters its victim’s homes through the keyhole. Once inside, the Liderc shapeshifts into a human, often taking the form of a dead relative of the intended victim. It rapes its victim and then makes the house very dirty before departing. Some reports say that Liderc becomes attached to its victims and never leaves. The Liderc can be exorcized by either sealing it inside a tree hollow or persuading it to perform a near impossible task, such as carrying water with a bucket full of holes. It is common even today for children in Hungary to stomp on eggs taken from a black hen or leave the eggs on doorsteps to cause mischief.

        4

Orang Minyak

Minyak

In the 1960’s a large number of young women were raped in several Malaysian towns. The attacker was described as a naked man, covered from head to toe with oil. Some said that Orang Minyak could appear invisible to non-virgins. Mass panic ensued, and many young women of the region began wearing sweaty, stinky clothes so the Orang Minyak would mistake them for male and leave them be.

Some speculate that the Orang Minyak was, in fact, a regular human criminal, who covered himself with oil to camouflage himself against the night, and to make him especially slippery to catch.

Sightings of the “Oily Man” have continued through the decades, with the last sighting in 2005.

        3

Alp

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Originating from Teutonic or German folklore, an Alp is a small, elf-like creature who is said to have climbed onto a sleeping victim’s chest, turned into a fine mist and entered the body through the nostrils, mouth or vagina. Once inside, the Alp had the ability to control its victim’s dreams, creating horrible nightmares. Its victims reported a breathless feeling when they awoke.

This may have been an early explanation for sleep apnea and other sleep disorders.

        2

Angels

Nephilim2

According to the Hebrew Bible, the Nephilim were a race of giants who came about as a result of fallen angels having intercourse with human women. Translated from the Hebrew text, “Nephilim” means “fallen ones”. Genesis 6:4 tells us, “Now giants were upon the earth in those days. For after the sons of God went into the daughters of men, and they brought forth children, these are the mighty men of old, men of renown.”

The story of Nephilim originates with a story of Shemhazau, a high ranking angel who led a group of angels to earth to teach humans to be righteous. Over the centuries many of the angels pined for human women, and eventually mated with them, creating the Nephilim. This unholy union is said to have instilled an inherit wickedness in the Nephilim, making them capable of terrible sin. God was so disgusted by their existence that he ordered the angel Gabriel to ignite a civil war among the Nephilim, which eventually led to their extinction.

        1

Aliens

Aliens

A modern-day version of the Incubi myth, there are countless cases of alien abductions, many with sexual undertones. Some reports suggest the use of an invasive anal probe, and others talk of a sexual union with the aliens themselves.

There are countless stories involving alien/ human lovemaking. Antonio Villas-Boas of Brazil claims that, in 1957, he was abducted by aliens and put in a room with a beautiful, fair-haired woman and forced to mate with her. Howard Menger claimed to have regular sexual liaisons with Marla, a beautiful blond woman from space who claimed to be 500 years old. In the 1970’s, a 19-year-old girl in California claimed to have been gang-raped by six blue-skinned, web-footed humanoids who attacked her after she watched their spaceship land.mmmm maybe she was on dug and made an orgy!

Due to the outlandish nature of the claims and the general lack of evidence, most people dismiss such reports. Sadly though, it is likely that many of the people who make such claims, do so as a result of a deep, psychological need.

Succubus

A 16th-century sculpture representing a succubus, Cambridge.

succubus is a demon in female form, or supernatural entity in folklore (traced back to medieval legend), that appears in dreams and takes the form of a woman in order to seduce men, usually through sexual activity. The male counterpart is the incubus. Religious traditions hold that repeated sexual activity with a succubus may result in the deterioration of health or mental state or even death.

In modern representations, a succubus may or may not appear in dreams and is often depicted as a highly attractive seductress or enchantress; whereas, in the past, succubi were generally depicted as frightening and demonic.

Etymology

The word is derived from  Late Latin succuba “paramour”; from succubare “to lie beneath” (sub- “under” and cubare “to lie in bed”),[1] used to describe the sleeper’s position to the supernatural being as well. The word “succubus” originates from the late 14th century.[2]

In folklore

According to Zohar and the Alphabet of Ben Sira, Lilith wasAdam‘s first wife, who later became a succubus.[3][unreliable source] She left Adam and refused to return to the  Garden of Eden after she mated with archangel Samael.[4] In ZoharisticKabbalah, there were four succubi who mated with the archangel Samael. There were four original queens of the demons: Lilith, Eisheth, Agrat Bat Mahlat, and Naamah.[5] A succubus may take a form of a beautiful young girl but closer inspection may reveal deformities of her body, such as bird-like claws or serpentine tails.[6] Folklore also describes the act of sexually penetrating a succubus as akin to entering a cavern of ice, and there are reports of succubi forcing men to perform cunnilingus on their vulvas that drip with urine and other fluids.[7] In later folklore, a succubus took the form of a siren.

Throughout history, priests and rabbis, including  Hanina Ben Dosa and Abaye, tried to curb the power of succubi over humans.[8] However, not all succubi were malevolent. According to  Walter Map in the satire De Nugis Curialium (Trifles of Courtiers), Pope Sylvester II (999–1003) was allegedly involved with a succubus named Meridiana, who helped him achieve his high rank in the  Catholic Church. Before his death, he confessed his sins and died repentant.[9]

Ability to reproduce

According to the Kabbalah and the school of Rashba, the original three queens of the demons,  Agrat Bat Mahlat, Naamah, Eisheth Zenunim, and all their cohorts give birth to children, except Lilith.[10] According to other legends, the children of Lilith are called Lilin.

According to the Malleus Maleficarum, or “Witches’ Hammer”, written by Heinrich Kramer (Institoris) in 1486, succubi collect semen from men they seduce. Incubi, or male demons, then use the semen to impregnate human females,[11] thus explaining how demons could apparently sire children despite the traditional belief that they were incapable of reproduction. Children so begotten – cambions – were supposed to be those that were born deformed, or more susceptible to supernatural influences.[12] While the book does not address why a human female impregnated with the semen of a human male would not produce regular human offspring, an explanation could be that the semen is altered before being transferred to the female host. However in some lore, the child is born deformed because the conception was unnatural.[citation needed]

King James in his dissertation titled Dæmonologie refutes the possibility for angelic entities to reproduce and instead offered a suggestion that a devil would carry out two methods of impregnating women: the first, to steal the sperm out of a dead man and deliver it into a woman. If a demon could extract the semen quickly, the transportation of the substance could not be instantly transported to a female host, causing it to go cold. This explains his view that succubae and incubi were the same demonic entity only to be described differently based on the tormented sexes being conversed with. The second method was the idea that a dead body could be possessed by a devil, causing it to rise and have sexual relations with others. However, there is no mention of a female corpse being possessed to elicit sex from men.[13]

Qarinah

In Arabian mythology, the qarînah (قرينة) is a spirit similar to the succubus, with origins possibly in ancient Egyptian religion or in the animistic beliefs of pre-Islamic Arabia.[14] A qarînah “sleeps with the person and has relations during sleep as is known by the dreams.”[15] They are said to be invisible, but a person with “second sight” can see them, often in the form of a cat, dog, or other household pet.[14] “In Omdurman it is a spirit which possesses. … Only certain people are possessed and such people cannot marry or the qarina will harm them.”[16] To date, many African myths claim[citation needed] that men who have similar experience with such principality (succubus) in dreams (usually in form of a beautiful woman) find themselves exhausted as soon as they awaken; often claiming spiritual attack upon them. Local rituals/divination are often invoked in order to appeal the god for divine protection and intervention.

Yakshini

Main article: Yakshini

In India, the succubus is referred to as Yakshini and are mythical beings within Hindu, Buddhist, and Jain mythology. Yakshinis are the female counterpart of the male Yaksha, and they are attendees of Kubera, the Hindu god of wealth who rules in the mythical Himalayan kingdom of Alaka. They are the guardians of the treasurehidden in the earth and resemble fairies. Yakshinis are often depicted as beautiful and voluptuous, with wide hips, narrow waists, broad shoulders, and exaggerated, spherical breasts.

Scientific explanations

In the field of medicine, there is some belief that the stories relating to encounters with succubi bear resemblance to the contemporary phenomenon of people reporting alien abductions,[17] which has been ascribed to the condition known as sleep paralysis. It is therefore suggested that historical accounts of people experiencing encounters with succubi may rather have been symptoms of sleep paralysis, with the hallucination of the said creatures coming from their contemporary culture.[18][19]

In fiction

 References

  1. Jump up^“Succuba”com.
  2. Jump up^Harper, Douglas“Succubus”. Online Etymology Dictionary.
  3. Jump up^“The Story Of Lilith”. jewishchristianlit.com. Retrieved 21 September 2016.
  4. Jump up^“Samael & Lilith”. istina.rin.ru. Retrieved 21 September 2016.
  5. Jump up^“Zohar: Chapter XXXII”.
  6. Jump up^Davidson, Jane P. (2012). Early modern supernatural : the dark side of European culture, 1400-1700. Santa Barbara, Calif.: Praeger. p. 40. ISBN 9780313393433.
  7. Jump up^Guiley, Rosemary Ellen (2008). The encyclopedia of witches, witchcraft and wicca(3rd ed.). New York: Facts On File. p. 95. ISBN 9781438126845.
  8. Jump up^Geoffrey W. Dennis, The encyclopedia of Jewish myth, magic and mysticism. p. 126
  9. Jump up^History of the Succubus
  10. Jump up^Alan Humm. “Kabbala: Lilith, Queen of the Demons”. lilithgallery.com. Retrieved 21 September 2016.
  11. Jump up^Kramer, Heinrich and Sprenger, James (1486), Summers, Montague (translator – 1928), The Malleus Maleficarum, Part2, Chapter VIII, “Certain Remedies prescribed against those Dark and Horrid Harms with which Devils may Afflict Men,” at sacred-texts.com
  12. Jump up^Lewis, James R., Oliver, Evelyn Dorothy, Sisung Kelle S. (Editor) (1996), Angels A to Z, Entry: Incubi and Succubi, pp. 218, 219, Visible Ink Press, ISBN 0-7876-0652-9, Till date, most Africa belief has it that men that have similar experience with such principality (succubus) in dreams (usually in form of a pretty lady) find themselves exhausted as soon as they wake up, and often ascribing spiritual attack to them. Again, rituals/divination are often resorted to with a view to appeasing the god for divine protection and intervention, while the christian folks direct their intervention to God through either fasting and prayer or going for anointing and deliverance (I.E. Bello)
  13. Jump up^Warren, Brett (2016). The Annotated Dæmonologie of King James. A Critical Edition. In Modern English. pp. 79–83. ISBN 1-5329-6891-4.
  14. Jump up to:ab Zwemer, Samuel M. (1939). “5”. Studies in Popular Islam: Collection of Papers dealing with the Superstitions and Beliefs of the Common People. London: Sheldon Press.
  15. Jump up^Tremearne, A. J. N. Ban of the Bori: Demons and Demon-Dancing in West and North Africa.
  16. Jump up^Trimingham, J. Spencer (1965). Islam in the Sudan. London: Frank Cass & Co. Ltd. p. 172.
  17. Jump up^Knight-Jadczyk, Laura; Henri Sy (2005). The high strangeness of dimensions, densities, and the process of alien abduction. [S.l.] : Red Pill Press. p. 92. ISBN 9781897244111.
  18. Jump up^“Sleep Paralysis”. The Skeptics Dictionary.
  19. Jump up^“Phenomena of Awareness during Sleep Paralysis”. Trionic Research Institute.

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